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Unhistorical: Poems

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Unhistorical draws on historical narrative, confessional poetry, and detective fiction to tell the story of a contemporary romantic relationship that begins in Scotland and falls apart in America, as the narrator finds herself in the role of spectator to her partner's genius. Many of these poems draw from the elegiac tradition, following a speaker who is, at turns, tourist Unhistorical draws on historical narrative, confessional poetry, and detective fiction to tell the story of a contemporary romantic relationship that begins in Scotland and falls apart in America, as the narrator finds herself in the role of spectator to her partner's genius. Many of these poems draw from the elegiac tradition, following a speaker who is, at turns, tourist in and historian of a landscape that is foreign to them. The middle section of this manuscript, entitled "The Resurrectionists," follows an alternate version of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Holmes and Watson as they journey to solve a mystery in Scotland while grappling with their own anguished friendship. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name: "Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow: yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent: ""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom: .0001pt; mso-pagination: widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family: "Calibri,"sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family: Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;}

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Unhistorical draws on historical narrative, confessional poetry, and detective fiction to tell the story of a contemporary romantic relationship that begins in Scotland and falls apart in America, as the narrator finds herself in the role of spectator to her partner's genius. Many of these poems draw from the elegiac tradition, following a speaker who is, at turns, tourist Unhistorical draws on historical narrative, confessional poetry, and detective fiction to tell the story of a contemporary romantic relationship that begins in Scotland and falls apart in America, as the narrator finds herself in the role of spectator to her partner's genius. Many of these poems draw from the elegiac tradition, following a speaker who is, at turns, tourist in and historian of a landscape that is foreign to them. The middle section of this manuscript, entitled "The Resurrectionists," follows an alternate version of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Holmes and Watson as they journey to solve a mystery in Scotland while grappling with their own anguished friendship. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name: "Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow: yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent: ""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom: .0001pt; mso-pagination: widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family: "Calibri,"sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family: Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family: Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font: minor-latin;}

36 review for Unhistorical: Poems

  1. 4 out of 5

    Joe Sacksteder

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. *Spoilers (mostly structural ones)* This collection is in three parts, and the second feels distinctly like the B-section of a large musical form, or the middle movement of an orchestral work. "The Resurrectionists: London, 1896" comprises persona poems from the world of Sherlock Holmes, including several excerpts from "Watson's Diary" as well as a previously-unreleased (invented by Cavallaro) Holmes tale, "The Adventure of the Hooded Woman," which is delightfully glitchy. What makes the structu *Spoilers (mostly structural ones)* This collection is in three parts, and the second feels distinctly like the B-section of a large musical form, or the middle movement of an orchestral work. "The Resurrectionists: London, 1896" comprises persona poems from the world of Sherlock Holmes, including several excerpts from "Watson's Diary" as well as a previously-unreleased (invented by Cavallaro) Holmes tale, "The Adventure of the Hooded Woman," which is delightfully glitchy. What makes the structure of this book so fascinating is that, while that second section seems cordoned off, the personae return to haunt the more potentially-autobiographical poems at the end of section 3 (and more intermittently throughout the collection), especially in "His Last Bow, 1919" and "Self Portrait as Sherlock Holmes." Thus the lines between speaker and persona blur—"Write again of my limits, the end, / the slow approach. In these rooms I carve out / other rooms"—showing that our fantasies are as much a part of us as what we might presume to be our selves.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gerard Azpiri

    "I wrote my name again and again and again, I would write it anywhere if it meant I didn't have to keep it." Such a wonderful and strong poetry collection. As someone who was privileged for having the opportunity to call Brittany Cavallaro my teacher, I can say that in this collection of poems she puts into work all the techniques and styles she teaches and takes it to another level that made me hold my breath for several lines in several poems. The use of personae in this collection is wonderful "I wrote my name again and again and again, I would write it anywhere if it meant I didn't have to keep it." Such a wonderful and strong poetry collection. As someone who was privileged for having the opportunity to call Brittany Cavallaro my teacher, I can say that in this collection of poems she puts into work all the techniques and styles she teaches and takes it to another level that made me hold my breath for several lines in several poems. The use of personae in this collection is wonderful, taking mostly the point of view of Sherlock Holmes and John Watson, and the more autobiographical poems are just as strong and powerful. some my favorite poems are: "Leitmotif", "National Health Service", "Performance", "His last bow, 1919" and "Self-portrait as Sherlock Holmes" This is a fantastic read and by far my favorite poetry collection that I've read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Hazelton

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sally

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Hess

  7. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Perchikoff

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hannah O’Toole

  10. 5 out of 5

    Erin Smith

  11. 4 out of 5

    Wendi

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kati

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alex Celine

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chasity

  17. 4 out of 5

    undertherowantree

  18. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Jackson Berry

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anca

  21. 4 out of 5

    marlise

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rose Hissom

  25. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Mottershead

  26. 5 out of 5

    Simeon Berry

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katie Martindale

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Robinson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  30. 4 out of 5

    E.

  31. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

  32. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Mortenson

  33. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  34. 4 out of 5

    Amber Dorland

  35. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

  36. 4 out of 5

    Mackenzie Broom

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